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Michael Angilletta

Michael Angilletta

President's Professor and Associate Dean, School of Life Sciences, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

angilletta@asu.edu

480-965-3500

School of Life Sciences
Arizona State University
PO Box 874501
Tempe, AZ 85287-4501

Titles

  • Senior Global Futures Scientist, Julie Ann Wrigley Global Futures Laboratory
  • President's Professor and Associate Dean, School of Life Sciences, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
  • Affiliated Faculty, Center for Biodiversity Outcomes, Global Institute of Sustainability and Innovation

Biography

Mike Angilletta is a President's Professor in the School of Life Sciences and the Associate Dean of Learning Innovation at Ed Plus. He earned a BS in Biology from The College of New Jersey and a PhD in Ecology & Evolution from the University of Pennsylvania.

Previously, Mike served on the faculty at Indiana State University (2000-2010), where he was promoted to the rank of Professor. While at ISU, Mike established an international reputation as an evolutionary biologist who focuses on adaptation to temperature, publishing numerous scientific articles and an award-winning book (Thermal Adaptation, Oxford University Press).

After coming to ASU in 2010, Mike got involved in efforts to improve the undergraduate curriculum in biology, which ultimately led him to serve as the Assistant Director of Undergraduate Programs (2012-2014) and then the Associate Director of Undergraduate Programs (2014-2020). In this roles, Mike administered nine degree programs on campus while doubling enrollment by launching three degree programs online. His team partnered with CogBooks to expand the use of adaptive learning technology in the curriculum and partnered with Labster and Google to develop online laboratory courses in virtual reality.

These experiences enabled Mike to transition to a new position in the School of Life Sciences as the Associate Director of Learning Innovation. In this role, Mike collaborated on a university-wide initiative called Dreamscape Learn—a partnership between ASU and Dreamscape Immersive that combines Hollywood storytelling and cutting-edge technology to enable students to conduct collaborative research in a virtual world. 

Now, Mike serves as the Associate Dean of Learning Innovation in Ed Plus, where he leads the development of learning experiences that blend best practices in teaching with emerging tools in digital technology.

Education

  • PhD, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, The University of Pennsylvania, 1998
  • BS, Biology, The College of New Jersey, 1992

Expertise

External Links

Journal Articles

2020

Elliott, D. B., J. P. Youngblood, M. J. Angilletta and A. J. Cease. 2020. Effects of temperature and nutrition on growth efficiency of the South American locust (Schistocerca cancellata) during the sixth instar. FASEB Journal 34(51 (Supplement: Experimental Biology 2020 Meeting Abstracts)):1-1. DOI: 10.1096/fasebj.2020.34.s1.04776. (link )

Graham, Z. A., D. J. Padilla-Perez and M. J. Angilletta. 2020. Virile crayfish escalate aggression according to body size instead of weapon size. Animal Behaviour 163(May):9-15. DOI: 10.1016/j.anbehav.2020.02.014. (link )

2019

Angilletta Jr, M. J., J. P. Youngblood, L. K. Neel and J. M. VandenBrooks. 2019. The neuroscience of adaptive thermoregulation. Neuroscience Letters 692(Jan):127-136. DOI: 10.1016/j.neulet.2018.10.046. (link )

2018

Camacho, A., J. M. VandenBrooks, A. Riley, R. S. Telemeco and M. J. Angilletta Jr. 2018. Oxygen supply did not affect how lizards perceived thermal stress. Integrative Zoology 13(4):428-436. DOI: 10.1111/1749-4877.12310. (link )

Rusch, T. W., M. W. Sears and M. J. Angilletta Jr. 2018. Lizards perceived abiotic and biotic stressors independently when competing for shade in terrestrial mesocosms. Hormones and Behavior 106(Nov):44-51. DOI: 10.1016/j.yhbeh.2018.09.002. (link )

2017

Basson, C. H., O. Levy, M. J. Angilletta Jr and S. Clusella-Trullas. 2017. Lizards paid a greater opportunity cost to thermoregulate in a less heterogeneous environment. Functional Ecology 31(4):856-865. DOI: 10.1111/1365-2435.12795. (link )

Levy, O., J. Borchert, T. W. Risch, L. B. Buckley and M. J. Angilletta. 2017. Diminishing returns limit energetic costs of climate change. Ecology 98(5):1217-1228. DOI: 10.1002/ecy.1803. (link )

Rusch, T. W. and M. J. Angilletta. 2017. Competition during thermoregulation altered the body temperatures and hormone levels of lizards. Functional Ecology 31(8):1519-1528. DOI: 10.1111/1365-2435.12869. (link )

Telemeco, R. S., B. Fletcher, O. Levy, A. Riley, Y. Rodriguez-Sanchez, C. Smith, C. Teague, A. Waters, M. J. Angilletta Jr and L. B. Buckley. 2017. Lizards fail to plastically adjust nesting behavior or thermal tolerance as needed to buffer populations from climate warming. Global Change Biology 23(3):1075-1084. DOI: 10.1111/gcb.13476. (link )

2016

Alton, L. A., C. Condon, C. R. White and M. J. Angilletta Jr. 2016. Colder environments did not select for a faster metabolism during experimental evolution of Drosophila melanogaster. Evolution 71(1):145-152. DOI: 10.1111/evo.13094. (link )

Sears, M. W., M. J. Angilletta Jr, M. S. Schuler and W. A. Mitchell. 2016. Configuration of the thermal landscape determines thermoregulatory performance of ectotherms. Proceedings of the National Academy of Science 113(38):10595-10600. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1604824113. (link )

2015

Ackley, J. W., M. J. Angilletta Jr., D. DeNardo, B. K. Sullivan and J. Wu. 2015. Urban heat island mitigation strategies and lizard thermal ecology: Landscaping can quadruple potential activity time in an arid city. Urban Ecosystems DOI: 10.1007/s11252-015-0460-x. (link )

Ackley, J. W., J. Wu, M. J. Angilletta, S. W. Myint and B. K. Sullivan. 2015. Rich lizards: How affluence and land cover influence the diversity and abundance of desert reptiles persisting in an urban landscape. Biological Conservation 182:87-92. DOI: 10.1016/j.biocon.2014.11.009. (link )

Sears, M. W. and M. J. Angilletta Jr. 2015. Costs and benefits of thermoregulation revisited: Both the heterogeneity and spatial structure of temperature drive energetics costs. The American Naturalist 185(4):E94-E102. DOI: 10.1086/680008. (link )

Posters

2015

Ackley, J. W., J. Wu, B. K. Sullivan, M. J. Angilletta, S. W. Myint and D. DeNardo. 2015. Rich lizards: How affluence and land cover influence the diversity and abundance of desert reptiles persisting in an urban landscape. Poster presented at the Seventeenth Annual CAP LTER All Scientists Meeting and Poster Symposium, 16 January 2015, Skysong, Scottsdale, AZ. (link )

2013

Ackley, J. W., J. Wu, M. J. Angilletta, D. DeNardo and B. K. Sullivan. 2013. Heat islands, landscaping, and the thermal ecology of urban lizards. Poster presented at the Sustainable Pathways: Learning from the Past and Shaping the Future, 98th Ecological Society of America Annual Meeting, 4-9 August 2013, Minneapolis, Minnesota. (link )

Ackley, J. W., J. Wu, D. DeNardo, M. J. Angilletta, S. W. Myint and B. K. Sullivan. 2013. Heat islands, backyard landscaping, and the thermal ecology of urban lizards. Poster presented at the 11 January 2013, 15th Annual CAP LTER Poster Symposium and All Scientist Meeting 2013, Skysong, Scottsdale, AZ. (link )