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Research

Research

Research

Summary

Understanding the thermal performance of various natural and engineered shade types is critical to supporting effective deployment of shade for improved human thermal comfort in cities. The heat mitigation services provided by shade must be understood in their urban context (e.g. underlying surface materials, surrounding urban form) and function of space (e.g. right-of-way, playground) to find the best shade strategy for a given location.

In this Healthy Urban Environments-funded project, the mobile biometeorological instrument platform “MaRTy” will be used to quantify the effectiveness of natural and engineered shade types in reducing human thermal exposure in Tempe, AZ. This pilot field experiment project will expand on an existing study by increasing the sample size and types of shade sampled. Preliminary results suggest that engineered shade structures (e.g. shade sails) are a viable alternative to trees for increased daytime thermal comfort and should be included in shade management practices. Natural shade (e.g. trees) varies in performance by species. This work is being conducted in partnership with the City of Tempe to support the City’s active shade management practices and assist in the development of guidelines and best practices towards achieving the “20-minute city” goal.Understanding the thermal performance of various natural and engineered shade types is critical to supporting effective deployment of shade for improved human thermal comfort in cities. The heat mitigation services provided by shade must be understood in their urban context (e.g. underlying surface materials, surrounding urban form) and function of space (e.g. right-of-way, playground) to find the best shade strategy for a given location.

Partners

City of Tempe

 

Personnel

Funding

Healthy Urban Environments Initiative

Timeline

April 2019 — Ongoing